Reflections Over 2016

We have been spending the last tumultuous month since the election making plans for what our work will look like in 2017. We know we’ll be busy doing the two things we do best — bringing people together and fighting like hell to protect our water and our future.

But we’re sending out this letter to remind everyone what we achieved together in 2016. To remind our members and allies that we are a powerful, diverse and a strategic force to be reckoned with.

We encourage you to read about our work last year and to begin making plans for the work we’ll do together in 2017. Please donate to help make this work possible. 

Building for Our Sustainable Future

We started the year working with our Economic Transition Team to strategize around how to promote the POWER+ Plan. This turned into the RECLAIM Act, a bi-partisan bill which has the potential to create economic development in our communities by supporting the reclamation of abandoned mine lands. This powerful bill grew out of our strong grassroots movement.

A coalition of partners, including The Alliance for Appalachia, worked hard on this bill – from our lobby trips to DC in March and June, to a massive petition campaign. The bill didn’t pass this year, but it was introduced in the Senate just last week! This is great momentum to be entering 2017 with. A poll conducted by Public Opinion Strategies found that there is 89% support for the RECLAIM Act among registered voters in seven impacted states.  We’ll keep you updated on its progress.

Our team has also been working hard to create a Shovel Ready Toolkit – a guide for communities who want to jumpstart their economy and clean up their land by supporting the reclamation of dangerous abandoned mine sites and coal related infrastructure in their community. The toolkit would provide information on federal and private opportunities to fund reclamation and highlight stories from exciting pilot projects that are already underway.

Fighting for Clean Water

We went to DC multiple times to speak up for a strong Stream Protection Rule and the need for strong, permanent water protections for our region. In December, the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) released the final Stream Protection Rule (SPR) – this important rule acknowledges the devastating affect that coal mining has on our water and will go a long way towards protecting our mountain streams from mountaintop removal coal mining.

This rule didn’t happen on its own – it happened because of the tireless work and advocacy of people across Appalachia and across the country. The Stream Protection Rule is the first major federal update to protect water from surface coal mining in 30 years!

Gathering Together – In Washington DC

We took several trips to Washington DC in 2016, but our most ambitious trip was the “Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future” event in June. Some key numbers:

  • The Alliance hosted nearly 40 mountain leaders for 3 days of advocacy and empowerment.

  • We attended 35+ hill meetings with Congressional representatives to show our support of the RECLAIM Act, contributed to the gain of at least two additional cosponsors.

  • We also had meetings with 8 different federal agencies and executive administration offices that have key roles in protecting our communities from environmental injustice and poor regulation standards.

  • For at least 12 of our attendees, this was the first time speaking to agency and congressional representatives in DC.

  • We celebrated 10 years of The Alliance for Appalachia with an empowering party and fundraiser.

Gathering Together -Closer to Home

We also took many opportunities to bring our mountain leaders together to share strategy and learn from the experts – themselves, each other.

In March, The Alliance hosted a Grassroots Policy Training in early April that was a huge success with nearly 40 participants! The goal of this training was to educate our members and allies across the region on how to participate in regional and national politics, and especially how and why citizen involvement is so important in shaping policy.

We also hosted Steering meetings, opportunities for our amazing leadership to get together and create our regional strategy, as well as team summits where our teams could take time to dig into their areas of concern and learn from all the different efforts happening across our region.

This year, The Alliance hosted two celebration events in honor of our anniversary. We shared food, music, memories and lots of laughs with longtime friends and new allies. Our vision of a world in which we, residents of mountain communities, are able to determine the futures of our communities, a world in which all people have access to clean water, clean air and a healthy land base- that’s what keeps us going. 10 years and rising!

New Members and New Teams

This year, our Steering Committee approved a new standing team– the Leadership Development Team. This team’s work plan already includes a six-month facilitation mentorship program which is currently underway, and an anti-oppression/collective liberation training in February 2017.

We welcomed the Center for Coalfield Justice as a new member organization of The Alliance.  This grassroots groups is based in Southwestern Pennsylvania and has long partnered with the Alliance as well as inspired us with their tireless work for justice in the coalfields.

We also welcomed Black Warrior Riverkeeper to our Alliance. BWRK’s mission is to protect and restore the Black Warrior River watershed in the northern portion of Alabama, America’s #1 state for freshwater biodiversity.

With the addition of these new groups, our coalition now unites directly-impacted mining communities from Pennsylvania to Alabama in opposition to mountaintop removal and other destructive coal industry practices, and in support of a just economic future for our region.

Moving Forward Together

On election day, a lot changed. But there are many things that didn’t change. We are still united to protect our water from the threats of dangerous coal mining and to create the sustainable future that our people deserve.

We still know that mountain people are the experts of their own lives, and that we are stronger when we unite together.

With your help, we’ll continue to do that in 2017.

For the Mountains,

The Alliance for Appalachia

Alliance News September-October

News from The Alliance

Welcoming BWRK to the Alliance

The Alliance for Appalachia is just tickled pink as a possum’s nose to welcome our newest member organization,  Black Warrior Riverkeeper (BWRK). BWRK’s mission is to protect and restore the Black Warrior River watershed in the northern portion of Alabama, America’s #1 state for freshwater biodiversity. Patrolling waterways, educating the public, and holding polluters accountable for the past 15 years has made BWRK an important proponent of clean water throughout the basin, and their partnership with the Alliance is sure to benefit the entire Appalachian region as well.

Last year, after nearly a decade of grassroots campaigning, Black Warrior Riverkeeper won a huge victory over Alabama-based Drummond Corporation, when the company announced it would withdraw its request for state permits to strip mine 1,776 acres adjacent to the drinking water intake for 200,000 residents of Birmingham and the surrounding areas.

We’re so grateful for the important work of Black Warrior Riverkeeper and all our member organizations. With the addition of BWRK to the Alliance for Appalachia, our coalition now unites directly-impacted mining communities stretching from Pennsylvania to Alabama in opposition to mountaintop removal and other destructive coal industry practices, and in support of a just economic future for our region. Follow them on Facebook!

 Staff updates

The Alliance for Appalachia is hiring! The full-time Coordinator position is an integral role to the work of our dynamic coalition. See the full Hiring Announcement here and please share the posting. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled, but priority will be given to those received before October 14.

With this announcement we also bid farewell to Alannah Tomich, who brought a fresh and intuitive perspective with all of her contributions to the Alliance.  She has moved on to the next part of her journey, but remains connected to our work and dedicated to social justice advocacy. Thank you Alannah– we miss you already!

In the interim, if you have questions about our work or the staff transition, contact Lyndsay@theallianceforappalachia.org

 

News from our partners

October 17 Rally to Save Coal River Mountain

From CRMW: “Stand with Coal River Mountain Watch and friends to tell the WV Dept. of Environmental Protection to end mountaintop removal coal mining on Coal River Mountain and everywhere. This ongoing process endangers public health with airborne blasting dust, pollutes streams, increases flooding, and deprives communities of traditional use of the mountains and forests. Join us Monday, Oct. 17, at noon at the WV Dept. of Environmental Protection headquarters at 601 57th St. SE, Charleston, WV 25304.” Click here for more info on the rally.

Tennessee Citizens Participate in Bond Proceedings

This summer, representatives of Statewide Organizing for Community eMpowerment (SOCM), Tennessee Sierra Club, and Tennessee Clean Water Network engaged in bond release proceedings for four mine sites in Claiborne County.  The groups participated in the bond release public input process, most importantly because they have members who live downstream of each permit area who would be negatively affected if the sites are not adequately reclaimed. Participants of the ongoing project include members from the affected communities and organizational volunteers and staff, all of whom have been involved in various steps of citizens engagement.

bond-release-collage

Through the process, they have learned how to monitor for bond releases, how to prepare for the bond proceeding, and how to request a bond inspection. Not only that, but the groups actively participated in the inspection by taking photographs, reporting on vegetation growth or lack thereof, logging GPS coordinates, and taking water samples. Group leaders said that part of what made the tours such a success was this division of roles, which allowed participants to engage with various levels of experience. After the inspections, SOCM, TN Sierra Club, and TCWN submitted comments in anticipation of the bond release. They are sharing what they’ve learned with other member groups of the Alliance through our Federal Strategy and Economic Transition teams, in hopes of supporting other citizen groups engaging in bond proceedings in the future.

Prosperity, Potential, Potential: A recap from the annual Brushy Fork Institute

Adam Malle attended the Brushy Fork Institute on behalf of Southern Appalachia Mountain Stewards (SAMS) and the Alliance for Appalachia this year. The story below is a recap from his time in Berea:

Let’s will begin with a little bit of background about myself. My name is Adam Malle, and as of March of this year I am a newly minted board member with the Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards (SAMS) in Wise County, VA. Our organization works to fight Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining in Southwest Virginia. We recently succeeded in a 10 year fight to save Ison Rock Ridge a mountain threatened by mountaintop removal coal mining in the town of Appalachia, VA and settled a lawsuit with A&G Coalthat will assist in the remediation of two coal tipple sites in Lee County and the City of Norton, VA. We are members in a coalition of environmental organizations that make up the Alliance for Appalachia (AFA) where I am newly serving on the steering committee as the representative for SAMS. It is through the AFA that I was given the opportunity to attend the Brushy Fork Institute.

This being my first excursion to the Brushy Fork Institute, I came to Berea College with high hopes not knowing exactly what I was in for. I chose the “Beginning Grant Writing” track out of my own personal interest in the subject area and to help SAMS expand our fundraising/grant writing capacity. However, grant writing knowledge was not the only thing I gained from my experience at Brushy Fork.

During the three days of the annual Institute I gained a renewed sense of the extremely diverse yet interconnected grassroots efforts to progress our Appalachian region and a greater understanding of the importance of building leadership capacity and knowledge among our region’s people. It is easy to feel isolated working in rural communities, but coming to a place like the Brushy Fork Institute and connecting with people and organizations from all over Appalachian Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia puts on display the optimism and resilience that drives us all, on a local level, to build a better, sustainable and independent future for all of us.

I came to Brushy Fork with the expectation of increasing my knowledge to further the goals of SAMS & AFA and I did. Christy Bailey’s “Beginning Grant Writing” track took my cursory understanding of grant writing and gave me a foundation to expand upon. I now have a direction and the confidence to continue learning these new skills and ultimately increase the effectiveness of our organizations work. But the experience was much more than that. It was an exercise in hope, optimism, inclusion, expansion of knowledge and a sense of connectedness with our common goal of building a better future. Brushy Fork is truly a family and I hope I get the opportunity to participate many times more in the coming years.

Movement Momentum– let’s keep it up!

We Stand with Standing Rock

The Alliance and our members stand in solidarity with the indigenous led movement of resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Bill McCabe is a friend of the Alliance and a leader in the stand against mountaintop removal coal mining.  His message to the water warriors on the plains of the Dakotas, speaks to our common struggles and commitment to protect our water, our future. Read the full letter of solidarity here.

From the Indigenous Environmental network (IEN): “The U.S. Court of Appeals Sunday night [October 9] rejected the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request for a temporary injunction to halt construction of the Dakota Access pipeline thru traditional unceded Oceti Sakowin treaty lands near the Missouri River. The three-judge panel issued its decision Sunday after hearing oral arguments from lawyers representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and pipeline developers Energy Transfer Partners earlier this week. The decision was based on a specific request by the tribe for the court to continue a work stoppage order on the pipeline within 20 miles on either side of the Missouri River.”

65+ Attend Appalachian Land Ownership Study Convening

Citizens around Appalachia and beyond– including academic and legal scholars, students, community leaders and organizers– attended the first planning meeting for a new Appalachian Land Ownership study that aims to update the landmark study published in 1981. Our friends at the Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network (LiKEN) co-convened the meeting as an opportunity to conceptualize the scope, methods, and process needed to embark on the collaborative research project, which aims to investigate how land use, ownership and tax revenue patterns impact our vision for a just transition.

While we are still exploring how we can support this effort, we see an opportunity for the Alliance and our member groups to play a huge role in ensuring the project remains community-based and citizen-driven from the outset. We see this project as an opportunity to build the foundation of a campaign to promote systemic change by addressing the longstanding challenges association with a land ownership model that has perpetuated environmental and economic injustice. Stay tuned!

Alliance Job Announcement

The Alliance is hiring a full-time Coordinator.  This position is a full-time (40 hr/week) Coordinator that works in conjunction with staff and volunteers of The Alliance for Appalachia member groups to plan, organize, and coordinate the operations and administrative activities of the organization in carrying out campaigns and projects in the region and federally. The Coordinator facilitates the development of strategies and priorities, as well as their implementation as crafted and finalized by the Steering Committee. This is a remote-based position.

The Alliance for Appalachia is a regional alliance with the goals of ending mountaintop removal coal mining, putting a halt to destructive coal technologies, and supporting a just and sustainable transition in Appalachia. The Alliance for Appalachia was formed in 2006 and is made up of 17 organizations across six Central Appalachian states, including grassroots organizations, regional organizations, and allied groups.

Click here to learn more about the Coordinator Position with The Alliance for Appalachia

Applications accepted on a rolling deadline. Priority will be given to those received by October 14th.

 

In Solidarity: NoDAPL

The Alliance for Appalachia stands in solidarity with the indigenous led movement of resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Bill McCabe is a friend of the Alliance and a leader in the stand against mountaintop removal coal mining.  Bill’s message below, to the water warriors on the plains of the Dakotas, speaks to our common struggles and commitment to protect our water, our future:

I am fortunate. I live in a portion of the Appalachian Mountains which have not been disturbed by mining, fracking, gas or oil wells, or other careless destruction of mother earth’s gift of clean water. I am one of the few so fortunate not to have had my water source poisoned. I am rich to be so lucky. I am aware that this gift of clean water should be honored and protected by those humans sharing the mountains that create that water. Therefore, for most of my life, I have joined with others willing to honor and protect this great gift. There are many in these mountains who have joined in the fight to protect mother earth and her gifts. There are many others who support that fight, but have not yet joined those who openly struggle to protect our gifts.

Right now, this very minute, there are thousands of brave souls that are sacrificing much to do that very thing. They are not in the mountains of Appalachia, but their struggle is the same as ours in these mountains. The struggle to protect their heritage, their spiritual values and their water. Their efforts are crucial to many beyond those gathered together at the spirit camps in North Dakota struggling to prevent the creation of the Dakota pipeline. Their efforts must be recognized! Their struggle is crucial. It is the struggle to protect the water source for millions of humans. The struggle to prevent foolish and greedy corporations who see only the dollar sign from building a pipeline under the Missouri River. The struggle to show the world that when people support each other and fight to protect their heritage and life giving water they can win against tremendous odds.

The thousands of individuals and the hundreds of indigenous nations who have united to fight the insanity of building a pipeline underneath a major source of clean, fresh water are respected, supported and admired in the mountains of Appalachia. There are hundreds of activists and multiple community groups who support you. We share your fight for clean water. We respect your history, culture and courage. And we love the bravery and unity you are displaying to the world.

I can only promise that I am one who will honor your effort each morning. I am one who will share your struggle with others in my community. I am one who believes together we will win this struggle. I am one who thanks you for showing us what unity means.

With love and support from the people and mountains of Appalachia,

Bill McCabe

Link to PDF version

June Newsletter

Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future- An Event Recap

Shout out from the Alliance to everyone who helped plan and execute our POWROF 2016 lobby event in Washington, DC, which was a major success.  By the numbers:

  • The Alliance hosted nearly 40 mountain leaders for 3 days of advocacy and empowerment.
  • We attended 35+ hill meetings with Congressional representatives to show our support of the RECLAIM Act, which may have contributed to the gain of 2 additional cosponsors while we were in town– Congressmen Roe (TN) and Polis (CO).  
  • We also had meetings with 8 different federal agencies and executive administration offices that have key roles in protecting our communities from environmental injustice and poor regulation standards.  
  • For at least 12 of our attendees, this was the first time speaking to agency and congressional representatives in DC.

_DSC5995

When asked what the most powerful part of the trip was for them, one of the participants said, “I am always in awe of DC, and feel very fortunate to just experience being near this much power. But actually being inside senate and house buildings and interacting/taking part in processes, leaves me feeling like each citizen has a voice, and we can be heard.”

Todd Waterman is a volunteer with Statewide Organizing for Community eMpowerment, an Alliance member organization based in Tennessee; the following excerpts are from an article that he wrote for the SOCM Sentinel about his experience at POWROF:

I jumped at the chance to go! If I’d learned one thing as an activist, it’s that saying “yes” to something I’ve never done before can be a tremendously empowering experience, and that so long as I don’t let my mistakes tell me I’m not good enough, they will tell me how to be better. If I had a lot to learn, that meant I’d learn a lot.”  [. . .]

“Research says in the US only the very rich influence legislation. Until we achieve campaign finance reform, lawmakers must keep their campaign donors happy. But I prefer to be optimistic. Activism, like voting, is a matter of faith, of humbly doing what we can knowing together we are strong. We progressives always win in the end, even if it’s often two steps forward and 1½ steps back: Democracy, Emancipation, Suffrage, Social Security, Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, LGBT Rights. Can you name anyone who is revered for blocking progress whose time had come? We’re trying to forget the guy who said, “Segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever!” But will we ever forget the guy who said, “I have a dream,” and then put his life on the line to make it come true? I hope we can convince more of our lawmakers to become not the villains of the future but its heroes.

Together, we too shall overcome some day. I’m honored to dream with you.”

To read the full article, click here.

Citizens’ Petition to Amend Self-Bonding Rules, OSMRE seeking public comments

In early March, WildEarth Guardians petitioned the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) to amend its regulations on financial assurances to ensure that companies and their subsidiaries with a history of financial insolvency no longer be allowed to self-bond coal mining operations.  Now, OSMRE is accepting public comments on the petition.  

Once our mountains are destroyed by mountaintop removal, no one can put them back. However, coal operators have a responsibility to clean up the mess – otherwise our communities are left surrounded by toxic eyesores and dangerous water.

Bonding is the process by which coal companies provide financial assurance that they will reclaim the lands they have damaged by mining. Because of weak and inconsistent laws surrounding this practice, the public is at risk for having to pick up the tab for the immense destruction of mountaintop removal and other damaging coal mining practices, while the coal industry keeps the profits.

The most irresponsible approach is called self bonding – or when a coal company simply promises they will reclaim our land after mining. And if the coal company can’t clean up their mess? The taxpayer is left with the enormous burden of cleaning up after their mess. Companies must set aside bonds for the full cost of reclamation to ensure adequate dollars for reclamation.

The coal industry is laughing all the way to the bank, and we’re left with dirty water and unstable lands.  We need you to comment today to protect our communities from this outrageous practice.

The OSMRE is taking steps to limit self bonding – and we need people like you to speak up to make sure the laws are as strong as possible. The public comment period is open until July 20You may submit comments by any of the following methods:

  • Sierra Club Action Link
  • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. The petition has been assigned Docket ID: OSM-2016-0006. Please follow the online instructions for submitting comments.
  • Mail: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Administrative Record, Room 252 SIB, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20240. Please include the Docket ID: OSM-2016-0006.

Appalachian Voices Publishes Preliminary Report on Innovative Mine Reclamation Project

Alliance member organization, Appalachian Voices is partnering with Downstream Strategies and Coal Mining Engineering Services to identify and analyze Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites in far Southwest Virginia for site cleanup and redevelopment opportunities.  The goals of the project are to, 1) Demonstrate the need for and potential positive impact of the RECLAIM Act in the Southwest Virginia coalfields as the proposed legislation moves through Congress; 2) Utilize results to accelerate Virginia’s deployment of RECLAIM and other funds; and 3) Promote AML projects that are forward thinking and adaptive to the changing economic realities in far Southwest Virginia.  

The partners are examining sites individually to assess their suitability for economic activities such as agriculture and agroforestry, commercial and industrial development, energy infrastructure and recreation.  The approach includes analyzing existing resources (like community interest and capacity, and proximity to population centers, transportation, utilities infrastructure, markets, etc.) around potential sites to locate the most promising locations.

Capture

The full report, which will provide a general analysis of the 15 most promising sites identified based on clean-up cost estimates and economic impact, will be released in the early Fall of this year.  Phase 2 of the project will move the sites with highest potential towards shovel-ready status, meaning the plans are in place and the project is ready to explore funding sources.  From the report, “Despite oft-quoted from statistics about the region, there are numerous, diverse bright spots on the map of redevelopment, from commercial and industrial projects to agriculture and recreation.”

Appalachian Voices has been sharing their progress with other organizations in the Alliance and throughout Central Appalachia, providing a template and useful reference guide for other states interested in undergoing a similar process.    

Learn more about the project here.

Celebrating 10 Years in the Region– You’re Invited!

The Alliance for Appalachia is hosting an event in honor of the organization’s diamond anniversary. We are excited to celebrate 10 years of grassroots coalition building in Central Appalachia, 10 years of pursuing our mission by working together to fight the abuses of mountaintop removal and other harmful coal technologies, and 10 years of envisioning a healthy, sustainable Appalachia.  

We hope you’ll join us for food, drinks, music, and story sharing among friends and allies in the movement!  

Save the Date 10 years- Hindman

RSVP Here: Facebook event, overnight housing request

May Newsletter

We’re headed back to DC to

Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future

The Alliance for Appalachia will be hosting an event to “Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future” (acronym pronounced POWR-OF) in Washington, D.C. June 5-8.

We’re bringing over 30 new and experienced leaders from across Central Appalachia. Big thank you to our volunteers and staff who have been working around the clock to schedule dozens of meeting, arrange travel, plan meals and plan an amazing party.

Why are we going? 

1) Because mountaintop removal is still happening. We’ll meet with federal agencies to reiterate the need for real protections from current and future mining, and to discuss the need for reclamation and strong bonding programs.

2) Because we need to reclaim our lands to build a new, healthy economy. We’ll urge Congress to invest in the future of Appalachia by supporting the POWER Plus Plan and passing the RECLAIM Act.

3) Because mountain residents are experts of their own lives. This trip will build leadership and bring community residents to the decision-making table by providing the space to effectively participate in policy making that shapes the future of our region.

4) Because we want to celebrate!  We’re excited to commemorate 10 years as The Alliance for Appalachia with our friends and allies!

Can you help support this important trip? Donate here to help provide scholarships.

You’re Invited!
Celebrating Our 10th Anniversary In Washington, DC

Come celebrate and enjoy live music, a silent auction and fundraiser, homemade Appalachia-inspired food and drinks, and a walk down memory lane!

The Alliance for Appalachia was formed in 2006 with the goals of ending mountaintop removal coal mining, halting other destructive coal technologies and creating a just and sustainable Appalachia.

You’re invited to our 10 Year Anniversary party that we will be hosting in Washington, D.C. during our Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future lobby trip.

When: Tuesday, June 76-9:00pm

Where: Stewart Mott House– 122 Maryland Ave NE, D.C.

RSVP for the event on Facebook – and share with your friends! Not on Facebook? You can learn more about the event on our website as well.

We are also having a celebration for our volunteers and members in Central Appalachia– If you can’t make it to DC, or want to celebrate with us again, come to Hindman, KY on July 13th!

Self Bonding Comment Period Opens

We’re working with a national coalition of groups to organize a strong response to a new comment period from OSMRE.

Bonding is the process by which coal companies provide financial assurance that they will reclaim the lands they have damaged by mining. The most irresponsible approach is called self bonding – or when a coal company simply promises they will reclaim our land after mining. And if the coal company can’t clean up their mess? The taxpayer is left with the enormous burden of cleaning up after their mess.

Stay tuned to learn more about this process and to comment. We’ll need as many people as possible to respond to make this important rulemaking as strong as possible.

Headed to DC: Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future

We’re headed back to DC to

Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future

The Alliance for Appalachia will be hosting an event to “Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future” (acronym pronounced POWR-OF) in Washington, D.C. June 5-8.

We’re bringing over 30 new and experienced leaders from across Central Appalachia. Big thank you to our volunteers and staff who have been working around the clock to schedule dozens of meeting, arrange travel, plan meals and plan an amazing party.

Why are we going? 

1) Because mountaintop removal is still happening. We’ll meet with federal agencies to reiterate the need for real protections from current and future mining, and to discuss the need for reclamation and strong bonding programs.

2) Because we need to reclaim our lands to build a new, healthy economy. We’ll urge Congress to invest in the future of Appalachia by supporting the POWER Plus Plan and passing the RECLAIM Act.

3) Because mountain residents are experts of their own lives. This trip will build leadership and bring community residents to the decision-making table by providing the space to effectively participate in policy making that shapes the future of our region.

4) Because we want to celebrate!  We’re excited to commemorate 10 years as The Alliance for Appalachia with our friends and allies!

Can you help support this important trip? Donate here to help provide scholarships.

You’re Invited!
Celebrating Our 10th Anniversary In Washington, DC

Come celebrate and enjoy live music, a silent auction and fundraiser, homemade Appalachia-inspired food and drinks, and a walk down memory lane!

The Alliance for Appalachia was formed in 2006 with the goals of ending mountaintop removal coal mining, halting other destructive coal technologies and creating a just and sustainable Appalachia.

You’re invited to our 10 Year Anniversary party that we will be hosting in Washington, D.C. during our Protect Our Water, Reclaim Our Future lobby trip.

When: Tuesday, June 76-9:00pm

Where: Stewart Mott House– 122 Maryland Ave NE, D.C.

RSVP for the event on Facebook – and share with your friends! Not on Facebook? You can learn more about the event on our website as well.

We are also having a celebration for our volunteers and members in Central Appalachia– If you can’t make it to DC, or want to celebrate with us again, come to Hindman, KY on July 13th! Learn more about that event here.

Save the Date to Celebrate With Us!


Save the Date to celebrate with us!

The Alliance for Appalachia is hosting two events in honor of the organization’s diamond anniversary. We are excited to celebrate 10 years of grassroots coalition building in Central Appalachia, 10 years of pursuing our mission by working together to fight the abuses of mountaintop removal and other harmful coal technologies, and 10 years of envisioning a healthy, sustainable Appalachia.

We hope you’ll join us for food, drinks, music, and story sharing among friends and allies in the movement!

Our first party is in Washington, DC on Tuesday, June 7, from 6-9 pm at the Stewart Mott House. RSVP and share with all your friends on Facebook!

We will have another anniversary celebration in Hindman, KY on July 13th – please RSVP for that party below and share the Facebook page with all your friends!

March Updates from The Alliance for Appalachia

This March We’re in Like a Lion, Out Like a Lion 

Contrary to the old phrase, March weather was in like a lamb, out like a lamb this year; it’s been a strangely warm winter and an early spring.

But at The Alliance for Appalachia, we’re in full on mountain lion mode all month long.

Welcome Lyndsay! 

We’re so excited to welcome our new Economic Transition Coordinator,  Lyndsay Tarus.

Lyndsay Tarus, based out of Huntington, WV, has a master’s degree in Public Administration from Marshall University, with a focus on governance in nonprofit organizations and public agencies. She was an active member of our member group SOCM during her time in Tennessee and is currently a volunteer and board member of our member group OVEC in West Virginia, working on advocacy projects including mountaintop removal, fracking, and safe drinking water. She has held positions with the WV State Legislature and Department of Commerce, giving her insight into both the grassroots and government process for change-making in our region. Her undergraduate degree from Middle Tennessee State University focused on local, regional, and global connections between peoples, places, and events from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives.

Lyndsay was born on Florida beaches, but raised in the lakes and streams of East Tennessee. Her connection to water, along with a deep appreciation of the natural world drives her interest in environmental preservation and cultural adaptation to changing ecosystems. She advocates for social, economic, and environmental justice as an avenue to peace and coexistence.

She will be conducting research into opportunities for community led reclamation project that can help heal the toxic legacy of coal in our region. She will also be coordinating our economic transition work. You can reach her at Lyndsay@TheAllianceForAppalachia.org

Traveling to Washington DC

We sent a team of ten people to Washington DC last week to meet with the Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation and Enforcement, to talk about the Stream Protection Rule and the need to reclaim our abandoned mine lands.

We met with the EPA, to ask them for strong water protections and to take bold action during Obama’s final year in office.  The group also met with White House representatives to request strong investment in our abandoned mine lands and our miners to ensure a brighter future for our region.  In addition, we met with Congress to share information about the RECLAIM Act and the need to clean up dangerous former coal mines, and touched base with national allies to strengthen our relationships and share the important work happening locally in our region.

It was a busy week! Thanks to our mountain heroes who made this tiring but important journey once again! We’re already planning a bigger lobby week in June. Speaking of:

Save the Date! June 4-8th  

Ready to go roaring to DC yourself? Mark your calendars for June 4-8th.  We’re excited to announce we’re bringing a larger group of mountain residents and allies to DC to advocate to end mountaintop removal and invest in a brighter future for our region. More details (including registration) should be out next month.

Click here to share our post on your Facebook page to help spread the word!

Grassroots Policy Training: Register Today, Space is Limited!

You are invited! Registration is open till March 25th! But don’t wait till then to register – space is limited!

The Alliance for Appalachia is hosting a Grassroots Policy Training for our members and allies across the Appalachian region. The training will be hosted at the Highlander Center in New Market, TN on Saturday and Sunday April 9-10th and is designed to help people participate in regional and national policy setting.

Research into Bonding Launching Next Month

The continued decline of the coal industry has drawn our attention increasingly to the flawed practice of bonding in our region. Bonding is the process by which coal companies provide financial assurance that they will reclaim the lands they have damaged by mining. Because of weak and inconsistent laws and regulations surrounding this practice, the public is at risk for having to pick up the tab for the immense destruction of mountaintop removal, while the coal industry keeps the profits.

The Alliance for Appalachia has initiated new research into the troubled state of coal industry bonding in our region. Our results and recommendations for policy changes will be released in April 2016.

Presenting at the Appalachian Studies Association Conference

Last weekend our Economic Transition Team presented on their work at the Appalachian Studies Conference in Shepherdstown, WV.

The roundtable discussion, titled “The Power+ Plan and Citizen’s Movement for Just Transition in Appalachia and Beyond,” reflected on the remarkably successful mobilization for just transition policy in Appalachia in the past year, including dozens of county governments across Central Appalachia passing resolutions in support of the POWER+ Plan.  The roundtable will lead to an article for the Journal of Appalachian Studies; panelists will be gathering the ideas from the session to inform the article and our work in the region.

Updates from the Movement: 

STAY Project Updates: 
The STAY Project (Stay Together Appalachian Youth) is celebrating the creation of a new full-time staff position in the region. This decision to move from part-time to full-time will expand STAY’s capacity to coordinate trainings, leadership development opportunities, and resources to build community for Appalachia’s amazing youth.  Just in time to support a busy year of programming – including the STAY Summer Institute:

KFTC Offers Kentuckians “A Seat at the Table” to Empower Kentucky
Kentuckians will have the opportunity this spring to help shape a new Empower Kentucky Plan to map out an energy future for Kentucky that grows jobs, benefits health and addresses racial and economic inequality while doing our part to reduce the risks of climate change.

The Empower Kentucky Plan will be informed by diverse public input, including ideas generated at a series of “A Seat at the Table” community conversations hosted by Kentuckians For The Commonwealth in April and May.

Learn more here. 

POWER Initiative Announces $65.8 Million in Funding for Appalachian Economy
During the funds initial year in 2016, $6 Million was distributed through the fund, including to Alliance for Appalachia members and partners

This year, there are new opportunities for community groups, local governments and non-profits to gain funds to invest in our new economy, learn more about the initiative here.

Winner of Goldman Prize Assassinated

We’re heartbroken to hear of the murder of Honduras Indigenous leader for the environment, Berta Caceres, and the stories of continued violence and murder of another activist in her community. 

Caceres won the prize for her work against a series of four hydroelectric dams that would destroy a sacred river and cut off food and medicine access to local communities.  Mountain leaders Maria Gunnoe and the late Judy Bonds also received this prestigious prize for their work against mountaintop removal coal mining.

Job Announcement

The Alliance for Appalachia is hiring! The Alliance for Appalachia is a dynamic leader of change in Appalachia, working for a just and sustainable future at the local, regional, and federal level. We’re excited to bring two new staff into our powerful network.

Applications will be accepted until the positions are hired. Preference will be given to applications received before January 12th. Please note this deadline differs than the deadline in the job description linked below.

For information on how to apply see our job description for the Economic Transition Coordinator position.